Harold Joseph Lucchi thumbnail

Harold Joseph Lucchi

July 21, 1926 - March 22, 2019

In the early morning hours of March 22, at the age of ninety-two, Harold Lucchi left this Earth on his way to Heaven, to be gathered in the embrace of his loving wife Anne. They were re-united after eight years of separation because Anne had passed away in 2011.

Harold was a wonderful, industrious man who had b…read more

In the early morning hours of March 22, at the age of ninety-two, Harold Lucchi left this Earth on his way to Heaven, to be gathered in the embrace of his loving wife Anne. They were re-united after eight years of separation because Anne had passed away in 2011.

Harold was a wonderful, industrious man who had beaten the odds many times during his life. He grew up in Cherokee, Kansas, the eldest of four brothers. Harold played sports of all kinds, and worked after school as a mechanic in his Father’s garage. As a teenager, he was proud to enlist to serve in the U.S. Army in World War II, as a member of the 7th Division, 32nd Infantry, Company C. Harold spent fifty-five days on the line in the worst of the conflict in the Pacific, on Okinawa. Harold was one of the few remaining from that conflict, and he carried grenade fragments from a Japanese attack for the rest of his life. In that action, Harold earned a Purple Heart. He beat the odds, because his incredible knowledge of machinery led to his being pulled off the front near Shuri Castle, in order to keep the essential vehicles in service. As Harold frequently said, what he had learned from his Father saved his life. More than half of his company had been lost. Harold finished his enlistment in Korea, and on his return he said that he nearly cried when he passed under the Golden Gate Bridge.

On July 6, 1947, Harold married Anne Clugston, and the two of them set off for the University of Kansas on the G.I. Bill, where he earned his degree in Civil Engineering. Together, Anne and Harold met the challenges involved in attaining his degree. Again, Harold beat the odds by becoming the first in his family to earn a college degree.

With all that accomplished, Harold entered the burgeoning oil industry, and spent his entire career keeping the oil flowing from fields in Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and later from the Permian Basin. Harold stayed with City Service through their acquisition by Occidental Permian. When asked to describe the production in his area of responsibility, Harold detailed them. The Execs with Permian said, “No, we simply wanted to know the area you were responsible for.” They couldn’t believe that he was in charge of outflow from such an enormous number of wells, but he was.

Harold was always a feisty, fun-loving, and jovial man. He never met a man or woman he couldn’t befriend. Lifetime oil company families became golfing buddies too. Many hours of relaxation were spent on the fairways and greens. You knew that you were special to Harold when he assigned you a nickname and teased you.

After decades of hard work, Harold developed medical problems arising from his heart. Harold beat the odds again, after becoming one of the early recipients of open heart coronary artery surgery, and living three decades of full life beyond that. He was a man who continued to love golf, and played enthusiastically in his years of retirement. After declining health made that enjoyment impossible, in his early eighties, Harold set aside the clubs, but he still loved to motor down the block to the club in his golf cart, to visit and reminisce with good friends.

Harold is survived by his daughters, Greta (Scott) Murray of Billings, Montana, Gina (Corky) Allen of Austin, Texas, six grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is also survived by two brothers, still living in Kansas, as well as many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and grand-nephews, as well as one of Anne’s brothers. Harold would also give a nod of goodbye to numerous coffee groups, golf foursomes, and countless close friends. He would also want his special companion of his later years, Doris Taylor, remembered with affection.

Our family would also like to express gratitude, and to bless the work of all of the home health nurses and Hospice of Midland nurses who attended to Harold’s needs in his final months. Words can’t adequately describe the difference your care made.

A memorial service for Harold will be held on Saturday, April 27th, at the First Presbyterian Church at 2:00 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The American Heart Association in Harold’s memory.

Arrangements were entrusted to Nalley-Pickle & Welch Funeral Home & Crematory in Midland. Online condolences may be made at www.npwelch.com.
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Service Information

Service Information

Date: April 27, 2019

Time: 4/27/19 2:00 pm

First Presbyterian Church, Midland

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Harold Joseph Lucchi thumbnail

Harold Joseph Lucchi

July 21, 1926 - March 22, 2019

In the early morning hours of March 22, at the age of ninety-two, Harold Lucchi left this Earth on his way to Heaven, to be gathered in the embrace of his loving wife Anne. They were re-united after eight years of separation because Anne had passed away in 2011.

Harold was a wonderful, industrious man who had b…read more

In the early morning hours of March 22, at the age of ninety-two, Harold Lucchi left this Earth on his way to Heaven, to be gathered in the embrace of his loving wife Anne. They were re-united after eight years of separation because Anne had passed away in 2011.

Harold was a wonderful, industrious man who had beaten the odds many times during his life. He grew up in Cherokee, Kansas, the eldest of four brothers. Harold played sports of all kinds, and worked after school as a mechanic in his Father’s garage. As a teenager, he was proud to enlist to serve in the U.S. Army in World War II, as a member of the 7th Division, 32nd Infantry, Company C. Harold spent fifty-five days on the line in the worst of the conflict in the Pacific, on Okinawa. Harold was one of the few remaining from that conflict, and he carried grenade fragments from a Japanese attack for the rest of his life. In that action, Harold earned a Purple Heart. He beat the odds, because his incredible knowledge of machinery led to his being pulled off the front near Shuri Castle, in order to keep the essential vehicles in service. As Harold frequently said, what he had learned from his Father saved his life. More than half of his company had been lost. Harold finished his enlistment in Korea, and on his return he said that he nearly cried when he passed under the Golden Gate Bridge.

On July 6, 1947, Harold married Anne Clugston, and the two of them set off for the University of Kansas on the G.I. Bill, where he earned his degree in Civil Engineering. Together, Anne and Harold met the challenges involved in attaining his degree. Again, Harold beat the odds by becoming the first in his family to earn a college degree.

With all that accomplished, Harold entered the burgeoning oil industry, and spent his entire career keeping the oil flowing from fields in Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and later from the Permian Basin. Harold stayed with City Service through their acquisition by Occidental Permian. When asked to describe the production in his area of responsibility, Harold detailed them. The Execs with Permian said, “No, we simply wanted to know the area you were responsible for.” They couldn’t believe that he was in charge of outflow from such an enormous number of wells, but he was.

Harold was always a feisty, fun-loving, and jovial man. He never met a man or woman he couldn’t befriend. Lifetime oil company families became golfing buddies too. Many hours of relaxation were spent on the fairways and greens. You knew that you were special to Harold when he assigned you a nickname and teased you.

After decades of hard work, Harold developed medical problems arising from his heart. Harold beat the odds again, after becoming one of the early recipients of open heart coronary artery surgery, and living three decades of full life beyond that. He was a man who continued to love golf, and played enthusiastically in his years of retirement. After declining health made that enjoyment impossible, in his early eighties, Harold set aside the clubs, but he still loved to motor down the block to the club in his golf cart, to visit and reminisce with good friends.

Harold is survived by his daughters, Greta (Scott) Murray of Billings, Montana, Gina (Corky) Allen of Austin, Texas, six grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is also survived by two brothers, still living in Kansas, as well as many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and grand-nephews, as well as one of Anne’s brothers. Harold would also give a nod of goodbye to numerous coffee groups, golf foursomes, and countless close friends. He would also want his special companion of his later years, Doris Taylor, remembered with affection.

Our family would also like to express gratitude, and to bless the work of all of the home health nurses and Hospice of Midland nurses who attended to Harold’s needs in his final months. Words can’t adequately describe the difference your care made.

A memorial service for Harold will be held on Saturday, April 27th, at the First Presbyterian Church at 2:00 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The American Heart Association in Harold’s memory.

Arrangements were entrusted to Nalley-Pickle & Welch Funeral Home & Crematory in Midland. Online condolences may be made at www.npwelch.com.
.

hide
 

Service Information

Service Information

Date: April 27, 2019

Time: 4/27/19 2:00 pm

First Presbyterian Church, Midland



Life Event Timeline

Help tell the story of Harold's life by contributing to the Life Event Timeline. Upload the photo of an event...

Post an Event






Leave a Condolence

View All Condolences Post a Condolence
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